Strength training: The trouble with the no pain, no gain philosophy

Strength training: The trouble with the no pain, no gain philosophy

“No pain, no gain!” has been recited over and over again perhaps by millions of people.

It is almost a mantra unto itself.

Today I venture to rock the proverbial boat on this well-worn cliche, due to its misuse by so many people.

There needs to be a distinction made between focused, dedicated, relentless effort and physical pain (which is often the warning sign of an impending injury).

A while ago I was watching an online video on strongman training. I respect these guys a lot, and I value the way they train.

One thing caught my attention, though: it was a guy who went after it so hard that he ripped his pectoral muscle.

Did he have a warning sign of pain first?

After doing various types of training for almost four decades, and incurring several injuries myself, I have learned to take note of pain in the body, and what it means.

Going for that extra rep or heavier poundage when I felt a slight pain in a tendon or muscle has resulted in my own injuries a few times in the past.

That was when I used to believe that “No pain, no gain” was the best way to train. That has changed!

I am definitely in favor of a person giving their best when they train; however, getting injured is not going to improve anyone’s overall conditioning.

If your body tells you something is about to give out, listen to it!

It will tell you “louder” next time if you don’t.

By Frank DiMeo

Choose the program that is best for you!

2018-04-04T20:59:12+00:00